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Whey protein is rapidly becoming a popular ingredient in clinical applications, thanks to its full complement of essential amino acids as well as several other bioactive constituents that together support treatment regimes for a number of common conditions, including sarcopenia, obesity and malnutrition, post-illness recovery. Such far-reaching potential is seeing rising global demand for whey protein in clinical nutrition, heading for USD 1.5 billion in sales by 2023.

Today, a wide variety of ingredients may appear on the label of infant formulas – a label mothers need to use to determine which product is right for their precious offspring. Alpha-lactalbumin, whey protein hydrolysates, OPN, phospholipids and MFGM are just some of the ingredients being highlighted, giving consumers plenty more to ponder over.

What does it take to win (or even just survive) in a highly competitive and closely regulated market like that of infant formula? That’s the focus of Frost & Sullivan’s 2018 research into best practices in the global infant nutrition industry, which uncovered three aspects, in particular, as crucial for success.

It may not be as familiar as the much-talked-about idea of a new, circular economy. But we are also witnessing the dawn of a new ‘bioeconomy’ – a model that can contribute to the broader concept of a circular economy by applying technology to use our biological resources more responsibly, wasting much less.

The prevalence of Type 2 diabetes has increased markedly over the last few decades, bringing with it a long list of complications including cardiovascular disease, cancer, damage to the nervous system, eyes and kidneys, cognitive function and heightened risk of dementia. Naturally, the diagnosis impacts on quality of life, and the disease comprises a growing economic burden for society.

The hunt for new and better ways to control blood sugar levels for diabetes patients is certainly nothing new in medical science. Exploring the efficacy of whey protein-based solutions to the problem, however, is still in its infancy. What are the likely next steps for such research? And what do we hope to reveal?
To meet the 2050 challenge of feeding a rapidly expanding human population, we must carefully consider how to produce enough protein. Because, at least with current supply realities, a significant move to plant-based protein sources simply wouldn’t be sustainable.